Trendwatching: Eco-fatigue, Gen Z and Pet-Passe the future of marketing!

November 7, 2007

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As someone who watches for trends in technology one of the many sites I frequent is Trendwatching.com. They offer a bevy of free research reports on global Trends with pithy insightful commentary and links. If your not getting their free reports or buying the paid stuff, then your missing out. Their most recent Trend Briefing is by far the best I’ve read so far. They pulled out all the stops for this, their 5th anniversary issue, covering 5 of the hottest trends that are happening right now.

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Vivoleum: The Yes Men Light Up Oil Industry

June 15, 2007

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It looks like the logo for a cool new Web 2.0 company and sounds like the name of a pill to stop geriatric incontinence but Vivoleum is a lot more. Postioned, by the non-evil good guys at ExxonMobil, as a renewable non-polluting energy source, Vivoleum is a major step towards ending American energy dependence. ExxonMobil, hoping to move into more sustainable products, created Vivoleum though a new technique that mimicks the natural process that created crude oil millions of years ago. Details remain scketchy, but Exxon is apparently using billions of pounds of organic matter that would otherwise simply be dumped into the earth and processing that matter to make oil. The ambitious plan was announced at the Go-Expo Energy Conference in Canada and the Canucks were floored by the announcement. Click here for more information and pictures from the event.

Thanks go to Matt Rietman for the story.

Updated: Video Tribute to Reggie Spanglehart Watts, the first ExxonMobil employee processed into Vivoleum. Thanks Reggie, your sacrifice has made the world a brighter place for all of us. I have been so moved by this story that I hope that the good folks at Vivoleum sell some of the Reggie Watts candles in the near future.


MAJOR RECORD LABELS WITHDRAW FROM RIAA

April 1, 2007

garland_logo-1.gifThis amazing bit of news was forwarded by Fred Benenson of Free Culture @ NYU. It’s amazing news and a critical development for the online music space. You can get more information at the RARA site and I’ve duplicated their message in full below without commentary:

From: Press Contact <respectartistaudience@gmail.com>
Date: Mar 31, 2007 7:58 PM
Subject: MAJOR RECORD LABELS WITHDRAW FROM RIAA

MAJOR RECORD LABELS WITHDRAW FROM RIAA
Apple and Microsoft Help Launch RARA: Respect Artist, Respect Audience

April 1, 2007 (Hollywood, CA) – In a major break from the litigious and often alienating strategy pursued by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) against everyone from preteens to college students and grandmothers, the four major record labels have decided to drop all pending lawsuits and instead join with Apple and Microsoft to eliminate Digital Rights Management (DRM) from music sales. The companies are joining other personal electronics manufacturers and independent labels in a new organization, Respect the Artist, Respect the Audience (RARA).

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Linden Labs Does Right By Parody Second Life Site

January 22, 2007

I’ve played with Second Life on and off for a little over a year and have been as underwhelmed by the experience as I’ve been overwhelmed with the passion of its users. Some folks “grok” Second Life and some folks dont. I’m definitely one of the donts. To me SL is just D&D 2.0 with a larger percentage of girl geeks. Enter, GetaFirstLife.com, a great send-up of SL by Darren Barefoot, a canuck techie and Shakespeare fan.

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My Last Zune Post

November 27, 2006

Unless MS does something amazingly stoopid and unseemly I promise not to post anything else about the Zune. But this article from the Chicago Sun-Times is the latest (and perhaps most brutal) support for my view that the Zune is a flop.

Then go ahead and buy a Zune. You’ll find that the Zune Planet orbits the music industry’s Bizarro World, where users aren’t allowed to do anything that isn’t in the industry’s direct interests.

Ouch! Now thats harsh and a fitting note on which to end my Zune obsession.


Are NYTimes Reporters Finally Starting to Get it?

November 16, 2006

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Yesterday, while loafing off doing online research, I came across a new book titled We Think, by Charles Leadbeater. I’ll write a bit more about it in future but the abbreviated and much simplified premise is that “professionals” are luddites who are threatened by participatory culture and media folks are among the worst of this group. But no sooner do I start to read his book when MoniMon sends me a great article over at the NYTimes thats actually seems to be created specifically for online reading. The article is about the wealth of fine arts content on YouTube and mirrors another article they did this summer but was impressive in that it had embedded links to the YouTube videos playing right in the page.

Could it be that the reporters at the NY Times are starting to actually think of their long-winded rants specifically for online reading? Might we see more media inclusion, perhaps even embedded links? Check out the article by Charles Isherwood, its not a bad read if your into the topic and as I mentioned it does contains embedded links to YouTube content. Of course I cant help but wonder if the videos are copyrighted content and if the NYTimes.com is in fact supporting copyright infringement by linking to them?


Corporate Innovation Process Told Through gapingvoid Cartoons

September 29, 2006

One of the many astute observations made by the street philosopher and urban griot, Bonty Killa, in his seminal work on the moral decay urban centers, Caan Believe Mi Eye, was his observation that “everybody wan go heaven but no body wan dead.” This is a perfect metaphor for the corporate relationship to innovation. All companies want the heavenly rewards that result from successful innovation but few are willing to allow legacy systems, processes, hierarchies, thinking and models to die so that they can get there.

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